Royce Shook

5 months ago · 1 min. reading time · visibility ~100 ·

chat Contact the author

thumb_up Relevant message Comment

Talk to you soon, or talk with you soon?

I was listening to the end of a podcast on a radio show and the announcer said, I will talk with you soon. I thought that was an odd turn of phrase. As I listened to a few more sign-offs on Podcasts and news opinion shows, I realized that many announcers ended with the same phrase.

The English language is strange, one word can make a world of difference. I will talk with you soon is, in my mind, has a different meaning than I will talk to you soon. The first phrase implies a two-way conversation. You talk and I respond to what you say, we have a discussion based on hearing each other. The second phrase, to me, means that you will talk, and I will listen. This phrase means we are going to have a one-way conversation. I will not have the opportunity to respond to what you say but I will have the opportunity to listen. 

When I was teaching, I knew colleagues who would talk to their students about the subject and would only take questions if they saw that a student did not understand them. They did not like to engage in conversations with their students. I knew others who would ask questions and listen to the answers and engage in dialogue and conversation with students. The colleagues who talked to their students covered the material in the required time and felt a sense of accomplishment about making sure the students knew that they had covered all the material. The colleagues who engaged in discussion sometimes had to rush at the end to cover the material, but they believed that their students had learned the material. Neither was wrong, both approaches work in a learning situation, but it does not work for all interactions between people.

The Podcast host said their goodbyes by saying I look forward to talking with you soon, but they really meant, I look forward to talking to you soon, it strikes me that when we are engaged with another person, we should think about the question are we are talking with them or talking to them? The answer to the question, I think gives an idea of how we see our relationship or perhaps how we see the topic of discussion.

 

Ywk7p.jpeg
Bear

group_work in beBee Writers

thumb_up Relevant message Comment
Comments

Fay Vietmeier

4 months ago #10

John Rylance

5 months ago #9

John Rylance

5 months ago #8

Renée 🐝 Cormier

5 months ago #7

Renée 🐝 Cormier

5 months ago #5

Hey, @Javier 🐝 CR I think I found another bug! I just got a double comment.

Renée 🐝 Cormier

5 months ago #4

Don't get me started. You don't talk with someone, you speak with them. Saying, “I'll speak with you later”, implies that you have a plan to discuss something important. “Talk to you soon,” on the other hand implies that you don't actually have a plan but you anticipate you may have the occasion to speak together again. It's a rhetorical statement.

Renée 🐝 Cormier

5 months ago #3

Don't get me started. You don't talk with someone, you speak with them. Saying, “I'll speak with you later”, implies that you have a plan to discuss something important. “Talk to you soon,” on the other hand implies that you don't actually have a plan but you anticipate you may have the occasion to speak together again. It's a rhetorical statement.

Royce Shook

5 months ago #2

Thanks Fay

Fay Vietmeier

5 months ago #1

@Royce Shook 

Good point you make Royce 

 

.. talk with someone (implies two-way conversation)

.. talk too someone .. would seem to include talk at someone (hope to not be on the receiving end-though there might be reasons for such conversations 🤨

More articles from Royce Shook

View blog
2 days ago · 2 min. reading time

What is the Mind diet? Part One

I have lost some friends to Alzheimer's and am awa ...

6 days ago · 1 min. reading time

The Umbrella--a touching story

I do not know if the following is true, but it was ...

1 week ago · 1 min. reading time

In memory of

One of the people I call a friend, died of a strok ...